Monthly Archives: November 2015

Maria Torroba. Christmas show at London’s Stephanie Hoppen Gallery.Walton Street, SW3.

Maria Torroba Chelsea Mariana, 2015 Mixed Media on Canvas 180 x 120 cm (diptych)

Maria Torroba
Chelsea Mariana, 2015
Mixed Media on Canvas
180 x 120 cm (diptych)

Las Meninas is one of the most profound and enigmatic paintings in the world. You are the king. You stand patiently posing for your portrait, while the royal painter looks sombrely back at you from behind his canvas. This is the position into which Velázquez puts the viewer of Las Meninas. It's a big and paradoxical picture, a portrait not of the king and queen – who are only reflected in the painting in a bright mirror at the back of a high, deep room – but of the anxious court mirrored in their – our – eyes. Velázquez shows us the world a monarch sees. The "meninas" are identically-dressed maids who fuss over the Infanta Margaret Theresa, an expensively dressed little girl who even as she plays in front of her royal parents appears on her mettle, under scrutiny. She looks nervously at them while two court dwarfs and a dog are on hand to provide entertainment. One dwarf kicks the dog. It's a grave, chilly little world. No one (except the dog-kicker) seems relaxed and no one looks emotionally close to the monarchs – to us, who stand where they stand. The scene is intensely theatrical, everyone in their costumes and everyone on best behaviour. But at a door in the background a man is coming with news from Spain's vast and, when Velázquez was at work, decaying empire. Presumably Philip IV of Spain was happy with this ingenious conceptual portrait. As painter to the king, Velázquez was showered with honours. But this painting menaces the fabric of reality and the illusion of identity with its consummate game of mirrors. Do kings and queens exist only in the eyes of others? And if that is true of monarchs then who on earth are you and I, transported uneasily by Velázquez into the skin of royalty, attended by a painter who looks at us, polite, exact, and utterly ruthless in his craft? This painting is a disenchanted glass. Another Las Meninas is a shattering thought.

Maria Torroba’s picture reminds us of Diego Velasquez meisterwerk Las Meninas. Las Meninas is one of the most profound and enigmatic paintings in the world.

The “meninas” are identically-dressed maids who fuss over the Infanta Margaret Theresa, daughter of Philip IV of Spain. As painter to the king, Velázquez was showered with honours. But this painting menaces the fabric of reality and the illusion of identity with its consummate game of mirrors. As we see reflected in the mirror the King & Queen. Do kings and queens exist only in the eyes of others? And if that is true of monarchs then who on earth are you and I, transported uneasily by Velázquez into the skin of royalty, attended by a painter who looks at us, polite, exact, and utterly ruthless in his craft? As a courtier arrives with news from the crumbling Spanish empire.
This painting is a disenchanted glass.

Las-MeninasDIEGOVELASQUEZ.

Las Meninas is one of the most profound and enigmatic paintings in the world. You are the king. You stand patiently posing for your portrait, while the royal painter looks sombrely back at you from behind his canvas. This is the position into which Velázquez puts the viewer of Las Meninas. It's a big and paradoxical picture, a portrait not of the king and queen – who are only reflected in the painting in a bright mirror at the back of a high, deep room – but of the anxious court mirrored in their – our – eyes. Velázquez shows us the world a monarch sees. The "meninas" are identically-dressed maids who fuss over the Infanta Margaret Theresa, an expensively dressed little girl who even as she plays in front of her royal parents appears on her mettle, under scrutiny. She looks nervously at them while two court dwarfs and a dog are on hand to provide entertainment. One dwarf kicks the dog. It's a grave, chilly little world. No one (except the dog-kicker) seems relaxed and no one looks emotionally close to the monarchs – to us, who stand where they stand. The scene is intensely theatrical, everyone in their costumes and everyone on best behaviour. But at a door in the background a man is coming with news from Spain's vast and, when Velázquez was at work, decaying empire. Presumably Philip IV of Spain was happy with this ingenious conceptual portrait. As painter to the king, Velázquez was showered with honours. But this painting menaces the fabric of reality and the illusion of identity with its consummate game of mirrors. Do kings and queens exist only in the eyes of others? And if that is true of monarchs then who on earth are you and I, transported uneasily by Velázquez into the skin of royalty, attended by a painter who looks at us, polite, exact, and utterly ruthless in his craft? This painting is a disenchanted glass. Another Las Meninas is a shattering thought.

Las Meninas by Diego Velasquez is one of the most profound and enigmatic paintings in the world.

Maria Torroba Chelsea Mariana, 2015 Mixed Media on Canvas 180 x 120 cm (diptych)

Maria Torroba
Chelsea Mariana, 2015
Mixed Media on Canvas
180 x 120 cm (diptych) Inspired by the great portraits of the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries, Maria creates fabulous and original new works of oil and collage, incorporating Spanish and Belgian linens, antique lace embroidered by her grandmother, ribbons, hessian and even shells collected on her travels. These portraits have been shown in several exhibitions and are now held in private collections in Mexico, Argentina, London and Shanghai.

 

Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Pink Dress is an oil on canvas portrait of Margaret Theresa of Spain by the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez, though his identification as its author is not considered secure. It is now in the Prado Museum in Madrid. It was generally considered to be the last work in his oeuvre, with the dress by Velázquez himself and the head (left unfinished on Velázquez's death) and the bottom of the curtains completed by his pupil Juan Bautista del Mazo.[1] However, recent studies by experts suggest it may be entirely by Mazo. The Prado Museum currently assigns the work to Mazo. Its subject was the royal most frequently portrayed by Velázquez, also appearing in his Las Meninas and Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress. In the final years of his life he spent long periods producing portraits of her to send to the Austrian court for political reasons and in response to certain matrimonial arrangements made between the two courts. Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress is still in Vienna as are two 1652-53 portraits of her aged one or two in a silver and pink dress. A replica of the latter of the two, with variations, is in the Liria Palace in Madrid, though this is attributed to another painter. Contents  [hide]  1History 2	Notes 3	Bibliography 4	External links

Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Pink Dress is an oil on canvas portrait of Margaret Theresa of Spain , thought to be by the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez, though his identification as its author is no longer considered secure. This famous painting  is now in the Prado Museum in Madrid.  Recent studies by experts suggest it may be entirely by  Juan Bautista  del Mazo. The Prado Museum currently assigns the work to Mazo.
Its subject was the Royal most frequently portrayed by Velázquez, also appearing in his Las Meninas and Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress. In the final years of his life he spent long periods producing portraits of her to send to the Austrian court for political reasons and in response to certain matrimonial arrangements made between the two courts. Infanta Margarita Teresa in a Blue Dress is still in Vienna as are two 1652-53 portraits of her aged one or two in a silver and pink dress. A replica of the latter of the two, with variations, is in the Liria Palace in Madrid, though this is attributed to another painter. 

Picasso. Meninas inspired picture in the Picasso Barcelona museum.

Pablo Picasso. Meninas inspired picture in the Picasso Barcelona museum.

 

meninasmanolovaldes

From etchings by Manolo Vades.

With an essay Dancing Notes on Las Meninas,

written by Josep Palau i Fabre.

 

 

 

Rebecca Hossack Gallery, Conway street, London. Laura Jordan en ville.

Laura Jordan LAURA JORDAN: CRAZY TOWN 7 - 28 NOV 2015 CONWAY STREET, LONDON

Laura Jordan copyright
LAURA JORDAN: CRAZY TOWN
7 – 28 NOV 2015.  Rebecca Hossack Gallery
CONWAY STREET, LONDON. Courtesy with thanks Rebecca Hossack Gallery.

Laura JordanScandal in Background, 2015hand-finished print73 x 150 cm, 28 3/4 x 59 1/8 in edition of 50

Laura JordanScandal in Background, 2015hand-finished print73 x 150 cm, 28 3/4 x 59 1/8 in
edition of 50  copyright Laura Jordan. With thanks courtesy Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London.

Laura JordanMad-Hatten, 2012hand-finished print97 x 73 cm edition of 50

Laura JordanMad-Hatten, 2012hand-finished print97 x 73 cm
edition of 50

copyright Laura Jordan. With thanks courtesy Rebecca Hossack Gallery.

 

 

 

 

Frankel Painting To Be Sold For Charity At Tattersalls December Sale, 30TH November 2015.

Frankel Painting To Be Sold For Charity At Tattersalls December Sale A painting by renowned equestrian artist Jacqueline Stanhope called ‘Brothers In Arms’ is to be sold for Charity on Monday 30th November at the Tattersalls December Sale. The painting, depicting the incomparable FRANKEL alongside his brothers NOBLE MISSION and BULLET TRAIN, both now standing at stud in America, is to be sold in aid of the ‘Friends of the Newmarket Day Centre’. The charity, whose President is Julie Cecil, has been established in Newmarket for 34 years and specialises in care for the elderly in Newmarket and the surrounding area. 'Brothers In Arms' by Jacqueline Stanhope 'Brothers In Arms' by Jacqueline Stanhope Chairman of the Charity Nigel Wright said; “Newmarket Day Centre provides an essential service to the local community and we are delighted to have this opportunity to raise valuable funds for the charity. FRANKEL and his brothers NOBLE MISSION and BULLET TRAIN are all out of the great Juddmonte mare KIND, and were all trained in Newmarket by Sir Henry Cecil and Lady Cecil, who won three Group 1 races with NOBLE MISSION. The Tattersalls December Sale will provide a great stage to sell Jacqueline Stanhope’s tribute to Prince Khalid Abdullah’s truly extraordinary FRANKEL and his illustrious brothers.” The painting will be offered immediately prior to lot 1603, NEW ORCHID, the first of the Juddmonte draft of broodmares selling on Monday 30th November, and can be viewed in the Juddmonte Tent at Park Paddocks prior to the sale. For further information please contact Nigel Wright, Tel: 07802 699145.

Frankel Painting To Be Sold For Charity At Tattersalls December Sale
A painting by renowned equestrian artist Jacqueline Stanhope called ‘Brothers In Arms’ is to be sold for Charity on Monday 30th November at the Tattersalls December Sale.
The painting, depicting the incomparable FRANKEL alongside his brothers NOBLE MISSION and BULLET TRAIN, both now standing at stud in America, is to be sold in aid of the ‘Friends of the Newmarket Day Centre’. The charity, whose President is Julie Cecil, has been established in Newmarket for 34 years and specialises in care for the elderly in Newmarket and the surrounding area.
‘Brothers In Arms’ by Jacqueline Stanhope
‘Brothers In Arms’ by Jacqueline Stanhope
Chairman of the Charity Nigel Wright said;
“Newmarket Day Centre provides an essential service to the local community and we are delighted to have this opportunity to raise valuable funds for the charity. FRANKEL and his brothers NOBLE MISSION and BULLET TRAIN are all out of the great Juddmonte mare KIND, and were all trained in Newmarket by Sir Henry Cecil and Lady Cecil, who won three Group 1 races with NOBLE MISSION. The Tattersalls December Sale will provide a great stage to sell Jacqueline Stanhope’s tribute to Prince Khalid Abdullah’s truly extraordinary FRANKEL and his illustrious brothers.”
The painting will be offered immediately prior to lot 1603, NEW ORCHID, the first of the Juddmonte draft of broodmares selling on Monday 30th November, and can be viewed in the Juddmonte Tent at Park Paddocks prior to the sale.
For further information please contact Nigel Wright, Tel: 07802 699145. Info & image with thanks & courtesy Tattersalls.

 

 

 

 

Russian Art Week. Kasia Kulczyk presents Bulatov Exhibition. London.

We are thrilled to be staging Erik Bulatov’s first exhibition in London since 1989. Ever since the summer night in 1987 when Paul Jolles, the former Chairman of Nestlé, took me to visit the studio that Erik Bulatov was sharing with Oleg Vassiliev in Moscow, I have loved his work that is bold and powerful while being subtle and refined. — Simon de Pury Erik Bulatov returns to London for the first time with a comprehensive show since his epochal exhibition that was held at the ICA in 1989. During the years of Perestroika, conditions for artists that were not working in the only hitherto accepted style and manner for the first time found a possibility to exhibit their work to sell it and to travel. In 1988 Simon de Pury initiated the groundbreaking auction held by Sotheby’s which represented a turning point for both, unofficial as well as official artists working in the USSR. The two most important artists who have emerged on the international scene at that time until today were Ilya Kabakov and Erik Bulatov. Bulatov’s work caused an instant sensation. On one hand his very graphic and striking use of cyrillic letters were comparable to some pioneers of the Russian avant-garde such as Olga Rozanova or Maria Stepanowa. At the same time his figurative way of painting landscape, skies and people always contained symbolic content, sometimes ironic, humorist or political. The Centre Pompidou mounted a one man show in 1989. In the same year, the ICA in London was the first British Institution to show his work. Bulatov has pursued his career in a painstaking and single minded way, away from any preoccupations as to his positioning in the art world. Russia eventually recognised his towering importance and paid homage to him first with a first retrospective that was held at the Tretyakov gallery in 2006 and a second one more recently in 2014 that was held at the Manege. The last exhibition attracted hundreds thousands of visitors with long hour queues in order to be able to see his work. In 2012, the American Friends of the Hermitage Museum honoured Erik Bulatov and Jeff Koons as two artists of seminal importance in Russia and America. When Dasha Zhukova recently opened the new Garage building built by Rem Koolhaas, she commissioned Erik Bulatov to do a large mural in the entrance hall of that new institution. The exhibition curated by de Pury de Pury will focus on 15 more recent paintings and 16 works on paper, sometimes preparatory studies. Today, Erik Bulatov lives, together with his wife Natasha, in Paris, they regularly return to Moscow. Erik Bulatov paints very slowly and produces not more than 2–3 paintings per year.

We are thrilled to be staging Erik Bulatov’s first exhibition in London since 1989. Ever since the summer night in 1987 when Paul Jolles, the former Chairman of Nestlé, took me to visit the studio that Erik Bulatov was sharing with Oleg Vassiliev in Moscow, I have loved his work that is bold and powerful while being subtle and refined. — Simon de Pury
Erik Bulatov returns to London for the first time with a comprehensive show since his epochal exhibition that was held at the ICA in 1989.
During the years of Perestroika, conditions for artists that were not working in the only hitherto accepted style and manner for the first time found a possibility to exhibit their work to sell it and to travel.
In 1988 Simon de Pury initiated the groundbreaking auction held by Sotheby’s which represented a turning point for both, unofficial as well as official artists working in the USSR. The two most important artists who have emerged on the international scene at that time until today were Ilya Kabakov and Erik Bulatov.
Bulatov’s work caused an instant sensation. On one hand his very graphic and striking use of cyrillic letters were comparable to some pioneers of the Russian avant-garde such as Olga Rozanova or Maria Stepanowa. At the same time his figurative way of painting landscape, skies and people always contained symbolic content, sometimes ironic, humorist or political. The Centre Pompidou mounted a one man show in 1989. In the same year, the ICA in London was the first British Institution to show his work.
Bulatov has pursued his career in a painstaking and single minded way, away from any preoccupations as to his positioning in the art world. Russia eventually recognised his towering importance and paid homage to him first with a first retrospective that was held at
the Tretyakov gallery in 2006 and a second one more recently in 2014 that was held at the Manege. The last exhibition attracted hundreds thousands of visitors with long hour queues in order to be able to see his work.
In 2012, the American Friends of the Hermitage Museum honoured Erik Bulatov and Jeff Koons as two artists of seminal importance in Russia and America.
When Dasha Zhukova recently opened the new Garage building built by Rem Koolhaas, she commissioned Erik Bulatov to do a large mural in the entrance hall of that new institution.
The exhibition curated by de Pury de Pury will focus on 15 more recent paintings and 16 works on paper, sometimes preparatory studies.
Today, Erik Bulatov lives, together with his wife Natasha, in Paris, they regularly return to Moscow.
Erik Bulatov paints very slowly and produces not more than 2–3 paintings per year. With thanks & courtesy  Kasia Kulczyk

 

 

BAROQUE BAROQUE. VIENNA.

Olafur Eliasson, BAROQUE BAROQUE installation at the Winter Palace in Vienna Photo: © VIENNA ART WEEK 2015 The annual Vienna Art Week commenced from November 16 – 22 during unseasonable warm temperatures. A plethora of programming and events—some 200 in total—included establishment institutions and galleries, independently run off-spaces, and open artist studios. Exhibition openings were bolstered by talks, film screenings, guided tours, and of course performances. A splashy opening party hosted by Dorotheum auction house lit the night up in scores of Sekt and the local brew. In the revelries' aftermath, an intense week of art viewing and numerous panel discussions highlighted the cultural primacy of contemporary art. Under the rubric of the art week's socialistic theme of the “Common Good," noted sociologist Saskia Sassen gave a talk called “At the Systemic Edge: Where even the material becomes invisible." Time and again politics, economics, and activism were topics broached by lecturers. Belgian philosopher, critic, and curator Dieter Lasage discussed the notion of political populism as related to the Greek crisis and its leftist protagonists at the Kunsthalle. An all female roundtable of curators at the Academy of Fine Arts talked about the ways of financing their operations and very existence. That was euphemism for navigating around the often untenable conditions that come along with strings-attached government funding. Touchingly, in the case of Çelenk Bafra, curator at the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, she wistfully commented on failures, and the lessons gleaned from the administrations deeply troubling attitudes. Europe's refugee crisis, the inhumane Paris massacres, and institutionalized austerity policies thus make cultural exchange the last bulwark against outright barbarianism. And that's the civilized world techno-sphere for you, now where's the art???

Olafur Eliasson, BAROQUE BAROQUE installation at the Winter Palace in Vienna
Photo: © VIENNA ART WEEK 2015
The annual Vienna Art Week commenced from November 16 – 22 during unseasonable warm temperatures. A plethora of programming and events—some 200 in total—included establishment institutions and galleries, independently run off-spaces, and open artist studios. Exhibition openings were bolstered by talks, film screenings, guided tours, and of course performances. A splashy opening party hosted by Dorotheum auction house lit the night up in scores of Sekt and the local brew.
In the revelries’ aftermath, an intense week of art viewing and numerous panel discussions highlighted the cultural primacy of contemporary art. Under the rubric of the art week’s socialistic theme of the “Common Good,” noted sociologist Saskia Sassen gave a talk called “At the Systemic Edge: Where even the material becomes invisible.” Time and again politics, economics, and activism were topics broached by lecturers.
Belgian philosopher, critic, and curator Dieter Lasage discussed the notion of political populism as related to the Greek crisis and its leftist protagonists at the Kunsthalle. An all female roundtable of curators at the Academy of Fine Arts talked about the ways of financing their operations and very existence. That was euphemism for navigating around the often untenable conditions that come along with strings-attached government funding. Touchingly, in the case of Çelenk Bafra, curator at the Istanbul Museum of Modern Art, she wistfully commented on failures, and the lessons gleaned from the administrations deeply troubling attitudes.
Europe’s refugee crisis, the inhumane Paris massacres, and institutionalized austerity policies thus make cultural exchange the last bulwark against outright barbarianism. And that’s the civilised world techno-sphere for you, now where’s the art??? With thanks courtesy Max Henry for ARTNET 2015.

Olafur Eliasson, BAROQUE BAROQUE installation at the Winter Palace in Vienna
Photo: © VIENNA ART WEEK 2015

 

 

 

Suzanne Belperron Sothebys Geneva Auction

She is considered one of the leading jewellery designers of the modern age: Suzanne Belperron had taste, fame, and a pedigree list of clients. Today, among those in the know—collectors and jewellery insiders—the name Suzanne Belperron is still said in a hush, as though invoking a god. She was born fortuitously, in 1900, at the start of a new and fast-moving century. At the age of 19 she went to Maison Boivin as a designer, and in 1932, she joined Bernard Herz, having already attracted clients such as the Duchess of Windsor, couturier Elsa Schiaparelli, socialite Daisy Fellowes, visionary editor Diane Vreeland. Despite her success, however, Belperron remained famously discreet. “My style,” she declared, “is my signature.”  Belperron was the ultimate modernist, which may explain the enduring appeal of her jewellery, especially today. She eschewed showy displays of precious stones and diamonds, preferring instead to create jewellery whose select beauty quietly seduced. Her strengths were many: innate design sense; a penchant for unusual materials such as agate and chalcedony paired with sapphires and emeralds; a love affair with pearls. Amid the influence of Ancient Greece and Asia, nature is always fluid, and her many scrolls, volutes, and spirals express movement.

She is considered one of the leading jewellery designers of the modern age: Suzanne Belperron had taste, fame, and a pedigree list of clients. Today, among those in the know—collectors and jewellery insiders—the name Suzanne Belperron is still said in a hush, as though invoking a god. She was born fortuitously, in 1900, at the start of a new and fast-moving century. At the age of 19 she went to Maison Boivin as a designer, and in 1932, she joined Bernard Herz, having already attracted clients such as the Duchess of Windsor, couturier Elsa Schiaparelli, socialite Daisy Fellowes, visionary editor Diane Vreeland. Despite her success, however, Belperron remained famously discreet. “My style,” she declared, “is my signature.”
Belperron was the ultimate modernist, which may explain the enduring appeal of her jewellery, especially today. She eschewed showy displays of precious stones and diamonds, preferring instead to create jewellery whose select beauty quietly seduced. Her strengths were many: innate design sense; a penchant for unusual materials such as agate and chalcedony paired with sapphires and emeralds; a love affair with pearls. Amid the influence of Ancient Greece and Asia, nature is always fluid, and her many scrolls, volutes, and spirals express movement. Image and info with thanks courtesy Sothebys.

 

 

 

Cartier Diamonds selling exhibition at Phillips Berkeley Square. Cartier has partnered with Selfridges. Le Diamant November 25 & 26 November 2015.

 Fashion’s habit of suddenly swinging the focus from one aspect to another that is radically different has spread to jewellery. Excitement among designers and clients has concentrated for some time on the ever-increasing array of coloured stones and on bold ways to use them. So Cartier has chosen to remind us, in the most spectacular way, that over a quarter of fine jewellery sold globally is set with diamonds. “Diamond jewellery – both pavé and with a certified diamond centre stone – is by far the most important segment of the branded jewellery market in value,” says Arnaud Carrez, international marketing and communications director. “It dominates the market because diamond creations not only encompass elements of timeless style, but have long-lasting investment value and an emotional power.” To showcase this, the Paris house has put together Le Diamant, the largest diamond selling exhibition it has ever brought to the UK, with 200 pieces on show by appointment at Phillips auctioneers in Berkeley Square, on November 25 and 26. The idea is partly to reveal the breadth of Cartier’s diamond remit, with pieces varying from more accessible items to restored historic jewels from its Tradition collection of vintage pieces. Star of the show is the Oriental Tiara (second picture), dating back to 1911, containing 1,218 diamonds (price on request). Other unique pieces include a pair of versatile 1936 clip brooches that can also be worn as earrings and the recently made Pur Absolu necklace (third picture) with a 31ct pear-shaped diamond suspended from a 17.4-grain natural pearl, as well as two shield-shaped diamonds totalling over 7ct, on a complex, lace-like necklace of diamond pavé. This necklace features in a short film launched to coincide with the exhibition and to show off Cartier’s new Galanterie collection, whose star is a necklace (fourth picture) that blends diamonds, onyx, black lacquer and white gold and can be worn conventionally or reversed with a low-back dress. Model Karen Elson wears a large variety of jewels in the film to illustrate Cartier’s broad diamond brush (such as a 1927 platinum and diamond brooch, 1985 platinum and diamond ring, and platinum and diamond bracelet, first picture). Cartier has partnered with Selfridges for the exhibition, and its boutique in the department store also sells pieces from the show. On top of that, the exhibition highlights the Cartier Set For You service, where clients can choose a stone and have a bespoke ring created, so expect more marvels. Cartier, 175-177 New Bond Street, London W1 (020-7408 9192; www.cartier.co.uk). Phillips, 30 Berkeley Square, London W1 (020-7318 4010; www.phillips.com). Selfridges, 40 Oxford Street, London W1 (0800-123 4


 Cartier, the international jeweller to Royalty, has chosen to remind us, in the most spectacular way, that over a quarter of fine jewellery sold globally is set with diamonds. “Diamond jewellery – both pavé and with a certified diamond centre stone – is by far the most important segment of the branded jewellery market in value,” says Arnaud Carrez, international marketing and communications director. “It dominates the market because diamond creations not only encompass elements of timeless style, but have long-lasting investment value and an emotional power.”
To showcase this, the Paris house has put together Le Diamant, the largest diamond selling exhibition it has ever brought to the UK, with 200 pieces on show by appointment at Phillips auctioneers in Berkeley Square, on November 25 and 26. The idea is partly to reveal the breadth of Cartier’s diamond remit, with pieces varying from more accessible items to restored historic jewels from its Tradition collection of vintage pieces. 
This necklace features in a short film launched to coincide with the exhibition and to show off Cartier’s new Galanterie collection, Model Karen Elson wears a large variety of jewels in the film to illustrate Cartier’s broad diamond brush (such as a 1927 platinum and diamond brooch, 1985 platinum and diamond ring, and platinum and diamond bracelet).
Cartier has partnered with Selfridges for the exhibition, and its boutique in the department store also sells pieces from the show. On top of that, the exhibition highlights the Cartier Set For You service, where clients can choose a stone and have a bespoke ring created, so expect more marvels.
Cartier, 175-177 New Bond Street, London W1 (020-7408 9192; www.cartier.co.uk). Phillips, 30 Berkeley Square, London W1 (020-7318 4010; www.phillips.com). Selfridges, 40 Oxford Street, London W1 (0800-123 400; www.selfridges.com).With thanks and courtesy Cartier. Phillips Auction House London. Selfridges.

 

 

 

 

Cinecittà has been chosen to host Karl Lagerfeld’s Métiers d’Art 2015/16 show on December 1st. www.Chanel-news.com Cinecitta Roma

 NOVEMBER 19TH, 2015 THE MÉTIERS D'ART 2015/16 SHOW AT CINECITTÀ THE MÉTIERS D'ART 2015/16 SHOW AT CINECITTÀ Cinecittà, the city of cinema – built in just eighteen months prior to its grand inauguration in 1937 – houses twenty-one studios over nearly sixty hectares, with five giant film sets and a special pool for ocean scenes and naval battles. Three hundred films were shot there in its first six years, but the studios really took off in the 1950s when Mervyn LeRoy filmed his epic "Quo Vadis" there. Cinecittà became known as Hollywood on the Tiber as its low running costs drew major American film productions in increasing numbers: 150 epics were shot there over the following fifteen years, including "Ben Hur", "Spartacus", and "Cleopatra". Federico Fellini once said his favourite place in the whole world was Cinecittà's Studio 5, where he shot a series of major works from "La Dolce Vita" and "8 1/2" to "Casanova" and "Ginger and Fred", including "Intervista", a homage to the studios. Cinecittà was also home to such masterpieces as Vittorio De Sica's "Bicycle Thief", William Wyler's "Roman Holiday", and Luchino Visconti's "The Leopard". The sets are still used for many of the world's leading film productions to this day, from Anthony Minghella's "English Patient" to Ridley Scott's "Gladiator" and Martin Scorcese's "Gangs of New York". Cinecittà has been chosen to host Karl Lagerfeld's Métiers d'Art 2015/16 show on December 1st.


NOVEMBER 19TH, 2015
THE MÉTIERS D’ART 2015/16 SHOW
AT CINECITTÀ
THE MÉTIERS D’ART 2015/16 SHOW
AT CINECITTÀ
Cinecittà, the city of cinema – built in just eighteen months prior to its grand inauguration in 1937 – houses twenty-one studios over nearly sixty hectares, with five giant film sets and a special pool for ocean scenes and naval battles. Three hundred films were shot there in its first six years, but the studios really took off in the 1950s when Mervyn LeRoy filmed his epic “Quo Vadis” there. Cinecittà became known as Hollywood on the Tiber as its low running costs drew major American film productions in increasing numbers: 150 epics were shot there over the following fifteen years, including “Ben Hur”, “Spartacus”, and “Cleopatra”.
Federico Fellini once said his favourite place in the whole world was Cinecittà’s Studio 5, where he shot a series of major works from “La Dolce Vita” and “8 1/2” to “Casanova” and “Ginger and Fred”, including “Intervista”, a homage to the studios. Cinecittà was also home to such masterpieces as Vittorio De Sica’s “Bicycle Thief”, William Wyler’s “Roman Holiday”, and Luchino Visconti’s “The Leopard”. The sets are still used for many of the world’s leading film productions to this day, from Anthony Minghella’s “English Patient” to Ridley Scott’s “Gladiator” and Martin Scorcese’s “Gangs of New York”.
Cinecittà has been chosen to host Karl Lagerfeld’s Métiers d’Art 2015/16 show on December 1st. IMAGE & Info with thanks courtesy Chanel News.Nov 2015. www.chanel-news.com

 

 

 

 

Chanel News. 2016. Behind the scenes on www.chanel-news.com Karl Lagerfeld sketches the Chanel visiting card

Chanel S/S. 16

Chanel S/S. 16. A selection of images that capture the colours, themes & accessories of Chanel S/S 2016.

Courtesy of  & With thanks

Chanel S/S 16

Chanel S/S 16

 

 

 

 

 

CHANEL:S:S16:2

Chanel Grand Finale for S/S 2016 COLLECTION

 

 

Behind the scenes is the caption on the Chanel Boutique visiting card. Chanel News on www.chanel-news.com

Behind the scenes is the caption on the Chanel Boutique visiting card. Chanel News on www.chanel-news.com

 

 

Chanel S/S 16

Chanel S/S 16

Chanel S/S 16

Chanel S/S 16

 

 

 

 

Paris Street.

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, oil on canvas 83-1/2 x 108-3/4 inches / 212.2 x 276.2 cm (The Art Institute of Chicago).  View this work up close on the Google Art Project.

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, oil on canvas 83-1/2 x 108-3/4 inches / 212.2 x 276.2 cm (The Art Institute of Chicago). I miss you Marc Cheri.

 

 

 

Venice Festa della Salute. 21st November 2015.

FEAST OF OUR LADY OF HEALTH 21 November 2015 The Festa della Salute is probably the least “touristy”, and evokes strong religious feelings among the people. The holiday is, like the Redentore, in memory of another bout of pestilence, that the two-year period 1630-31, and the subsequent vow by the Doge to obtain the intercession of the Virgin. In 1630, more than half a century after the terrible plague of 1575-77, the disease gripped Venice once more. Doge makes a vow to build a church called the Salute, asking for the intercession of the Virgin Mary to end the plague. Even today, thousands of people parade on November 21 before the main altar of the imposing Salute Church to perpetuate the long-standing tradition of giving thanks to the city and the Virgin Mary City of Venice – Madonna della Salute

DCF 1.0

DCF 1.0

 

MADONNA2

MADONNA8MADONNA6MADONNA8MADONNA10

FEAST OF OUR LADY OF HEALTH 21 November 2015 The Festa della Salute is probably the least "touristy", and evokes strong religious feelings among the people. The holiday is, like the Redentore, in memory of another bout of pestilence, that the two-year period 1630-31, and the subsequent vow by the Doge to obtain the intercession of the Virgin. In 1630, more than half a century after the terrible plague of 1575-77, the disease gripped Venice once more. Doge makes a vow to build a church called the Salute, asking for the intercession of the Virgin Mary to end the plague. Even today, thousands of people parade on November 21 before the main altar of the imposing Salute Church to perpetuate the long-standing tradition of giving thanks to the city and the Virgin Mary City of Venice - Madonna della Salute

MADONNA3Madonna_Salute3MADONNA9

FEAST OF OUR LADY OF HEALTH 21 November 2015 The Festa della Salute is probably the least "touristy", and evokes strong religious feelings among the people. The holiday is, like the Redentore, in memory of another bout of pestilence, that the two-year period 1630-31, and the subsequent vow by the Doge to obtain the intercession of the Virgin. In 1630, more than half a century after the terrible plague of 1575-77, the disease gripped Venice once more. Doge makes a vow to build a church called the Salute, asking for the intercession of the Virgin Mary to end the plague. Even today, thousands of people parade on November 21 before the main altar of the imposing Salute Church to perpetuate the long-standing tradition of giving thanks to the city and the Virgin Mary City of Venice - Madonna della Salute

 

 

 

Phillips New York. Jewellery Auction 8th December 2015.

127 DAVID WEBB A Gold, Diamond, Emerald, and Enamel 'Tiger' Brooch Estimate $8,000 - 12,000

127
DAVID WEBB
A Gold, Diamond, Emerald, and Enamel ‘Tiger’ Brooch
Estimate $8,000 – 12,000. Images and info with thanks and Courtesy Phillips Auction House 450 Park Avenue.New York.

EMERALDSERPENT

Columbian Emerald & Diamond necklace with stunning diamond drop pendant. Estimate $U.S. 80.000 –  $U.S. 120.000. Image courtesy & with thanks Phillips Auction House, 450 Park Avenue, New York.