Quantcast
For ALL things nice…..!
Objects to Desire
Please visit our sister website - Objects2Desire
Post Categories
Posts History
April 2017
MTWTFSS
« Dec  
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
  1. We welcome any feedback, questions or comments

Nastio Mosquito, WEorNOT (Nastivicious’ Temple #1) (2016). Courtesy of Fondazione Prada. A few days ago in Milan, Italy, the Nobel Prize-winning Turkish author Orhan Pamuk, who is also the founder of Istanbul’s Museum of Innocence, was a keynote speaker at the yearly conference of International Council of Museums (ICOM). In a video-link message he delivered the following pearl: “In the future,” he said, “we need small and economical museums that address our humanity.” At the year-old Fondazione Prada this summer, it’s a case of shared humanity—but in a highly uneconomical envelope. Related: Take a Look Inside Miuccia Prada and Patrizio Bertelli’s New Fondazione Prada Not exactly a small museum, the 23-year-old Fondazione Prada’s 120,000-square-foot permanent venue in Milan (the foundation also has a palazzo on Venice’s Grand Canal) is sited at a former distillery in the decidedly industrial south side of the world’s most fashionable city. Predictably, it was designed by starchitect Rem Koolhaas, who has also built stores for the fashion giant in New York and Los Angeles. Koolhaas’s sober design is the opposite of the kind of flashy architecture recently revealed at other private museums around the world—consider Frank Gehry’s ditched sailboat at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and Diller, Scofidio + Renfro’s rhomboid with a veil at the Broad Foundation in Los Angeles. Additionally, the Fondazione’s sole patrons— Miuccia Prada and her partner Patrizio Bertelli—are not venture philanthropists in the mold of Eli Broad and Bernard Arnault. Not only does the couple give the appearance of being kinder, gentler billionaires, they have consistently declared their commitment to making their foundation “an expression of [artistic] freedom.” As Prada and Bertelli told the Financial Times last year, the pair is not looking to collaborate with artists to upscale their primary business (like Louis Vuitton’s rebranding campaigns with artists Takashi Murakami and Yayoi Kusama); also, they are definitely not searching for the art world’s approval. “The idea of the foundation,” they have stated, “is that it represents something significant, a proper act of research.” The institution, Bertelli has added, actively shuns go-along agreement: “It is against consensus. Looking for consensus is a form of mediocrity, and that is one of the worst of human weaknesses.”

Nastio Mosquito, WEorNOT (Nastivicious’ Temple #1) (2016). Courtesy of Fondazione Prada.Courtesy ArtNet News and with thanks WEorNOT (Nastivicious’ Temple #1) (2016). Courtesy of Fondazione Prada.Courtesy ArtNet News and with thanks

Milan, in Italy, A few days ago, the Nobel Prize-winning Turkish author Orhan Pamuk, who is also the founder of Istanbul’s Museum of Innocence, was a keynote speaker at the yearly conference of International Council of Museums (ICOM). In a video-link message he delivered the following pearl: “In the future,” he said, “we need small and economical museums that address our humanity.” At the year-old Fondazione Prada this summer, it’s a case of shared humanity—but in a highly uneconomical envelope.
Related: Take a Look Inside Miuccia Prada and Patrizio Bertelli’s New Fondazione Prada
Not exactly a small museum, the 23-year-old Fondazione Prada’s 120,000-square-foot permanent venue in Milan (the foundation also has a palazzo on Venice’s Grand Canal) is sited at a former distillery in the decidedly industrial south side of the world’s most fashionable city. Predictably, it was designed by starchitect Rem Koolhaas, who has also built stores for the fashion giant in New York and Los Angeles.
Koolhaas’s sober design is the opposite of the kind of flashy architecture recently revealed at other private museums around the world—consider Frank Gehry’s ditched sailboat at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, and Diller, Scofidio + Renfro’s rhomboid with a veil at the Broad Foundation in Los Angeles. Additionally, the Fondazione’s sole patrons— Miuccia Prada and her partner Patrizio Bertelli—are not venture philanthropists in the mold of Eli Broad and Bernard Arnault. Not only does the couple give the appearance of being kinder, gentler billionaires, they have consistently declared their commitment to making their foundation “an expression of [artistic] freedom.” With thanks and courtesy ArtNetNews

Black Aesthetics Trump Starchitecture at the Fondazione Prada
Few things look as forlorn, or beautiful.
Christian Viveros-Fauné, July 11, 2016 . With thanks and courtesy ArtNetNews.